Discussion:
The radio on Gilligan's Island
(too old to reply)
lsmyer
2004-11-06 16:57:31 UTC
Permalink
Since the mid-1960s, I have searched far and wide to find a radio that had
such good reception as the one on Gilligan's Island.

That incredible DX powerhouse of a radio could regularly pick up US mainland
broadcasters -- KDKA comes to mind -- from its location on a tiny island
located thousands of miles from the US mainland deep in the South Pacific.
Not just at night, mind you, but right in the middle of the day.

Also, this radio contained some amazing self-generating batteries. They
never ran low, despite the fact that there was no AC plug available for
charging purposes, nor did it have any type of crank-based charging
mechanism. It's possible that the batteries might have been the product of a
secret military cold-war era attempt at attaining a self-sustaining,
zero-point energy equilibrium.

I would like to get one of these radios and hopefully some of those
batteries as well. If anybody finds one on ebay, be sure to post it here.
Thanks.
Lee Smith
2004-11-06 18:54:30 UTC
Permalink
Hi:

Since the mid-60's I've been looking for a woman who had the same effect on
me as "Ginger" when I was 15 or so who comes equipped with her own
wardrobe, massive high-heel collection and makeup case!

Just to keep the post on topic ... sorry can't help with one of those
super-receivers ... LOL.

Lee
Telamon
2004-11-06 21:32:12 UTC
Permalink
Post by Lee Smith
Since the mid-60's I've been looking for a woman who had the same
effect on me as "Ginger" when I was 15 or so who comes equipped with
her own wardrobe, massive high-heel collection and makeup case!
Just to keep the post on topic ... sorry can't help with one of those
super-receivers ... LOL.
I like the voice of the female I'm listening to on radio Japan at 17825
right now.
--
Telamon
Ventura, California
Terry
2004-11-07 01:51:08 UTC
Permalink
Post by Telamon
I like the voice of the female I'm listening to on radio Japan at 17825
right now.
Telamon
Ventura, California
Tokyo Rose; maybe?
m II
2004-11-07 02:54:49 UTC
Permalink
Post by Terry
Post by Telamon
I like the voice of the female I'm listening to on radio Japan at 17825
right now.
Telamon
Ventura, California
Tokyo Rose; maybe?
I don't think she was woman. I read she was hung after the
war..therefore, she was hung *before* the war.




mike
Stephanie Weil
2004-11-06 19:43:02 UTC
Permalink
Post by lsmyer
That incredible DX powerhouse of a radio could regularly pick up US mainland
broadcasters -- KDKA comes to mind -- from its location on a tiny island
The actual radio was a Packard-Bell portable, model # AR-851. The
kitchen-cabinet handle and the antenna were added by the prop folks for
the show (to make it look more like a portable, I guess was the theory).

If you're lucky to find that model radio on E-bay, they actually do go for
a MINT, just because of its appearace on that show.

The radio itself is nothing special, just a white box with two knobs and a
slide-rule dial scale.

Here's a picture of it:

http://www.transistor.org/collection/packardbell/packardbell1.html
Post by lsmyer
Also, this radio contained some amazing self-generating batteries. They
never ran low, despite the fact that there was no AC plug available for
One episode, I believe showed Gilligan charging the batteries with a pedal
driven generator. Built in some sort of jerry-rigged "excersise bike"
contraption.
--
Stephanie Weil
New York City, U.S.A.
Bob Haberkost
2004-11-06 20:10:37 UTC
Permalink
Post by Stephanie Weil
Post by lsmyer
That incredible DX powerhouse of a radio could regularly pick up US mainland
broadcasters -- KDKA comes to mind -- from its location on a tiny island
The actual radio was a Packard-Bell portable, model # AR-851. The
kitchen-cabinet handle and the antenna were added by the prop folks for
the show (to make it look more like a portable, I guess was the theory).
If you're lucky to find that model radio on E-bay, they actually do go for
a MINT, just because of its appearace on that show.
The radio itself is nothing special, just a white box with two knobs and a
slide-rule dial scale.
http://www.transistor.org/collection/packardbell/packardbell1.html
Post by lsmyer
Also, this radio contained some amazing self-generating batteries. They
never ran low, despite the fact that there was no AC plug available for
One episode, I believe showed Gilligan charging the batteries with a pedal
driven generator. Built in some sort of jerry-rigged "excersise bike"
contraption.
After all, had the castaways not had the good fortune to have the Professor on-board,
they all would have died, and made the show last a whole lot shorter. That man
obviously had physics, chemistry, manufacturing techniques, electronics....pretty
much every technological discipline known at the time. It's a shame he didn't go to
Starfleet Academy, otherwise he'd likely have been able to put together a transporter
and zap them all back to Honolulu....again, making for a mercifully short series.
--
-----------------------------------------------------------------------------
If there's nothing that offends you in your community, then you know you're not
living in a free society.
Kim Campbell - ex-Prime Minister of Canada - 2004
-----------------------------------------------------------------------------
For direct replies, take out the contents between the hyphens. -Really!-
Bob
2004-11-06 21:15:08 UTC
Permalink
Post by Bob Haberkost
After all, had the castaways not had the good fortune to have the Professor on-board,
they all would have died, and made the show last a whole lot shorter. That man
obviously had physics, chemistry, manufacturing techniques, electronics....pretty
much every technological discipline known at the time. It's a shame he didn't go to
Starfleet Academy, otherwise he'd likely have been able to put together a transporter
and zap them all back to Honolulu....again, making for a mercifully short series.
Let's not forget how well groomed and dressed the castaways were. They
must have never worked Mary Ann's domestic skills into the storyline.:-)
TimPerry
2004-11-07 00:43:14 UTC
Permalink
Post by Bob
Post by Bob Haberkost
After all, had the castaways not had the good fortune to have the Professor on-board,
they all would have died, and made the show last a whole lot shorter.
That man
Post by Bob
Post by Bob Haberkost
obviously had physics, chemistry, manufacturing techniques,
electronics....pretty
Post by Bob
Post by Bob Haberkost
much every technological discipline known at the time. It's a shame he didn't go to
Starfleet Academy, otherwise he'd likely have been able to put together a transporter
and zap them all back to Honolulu....again, making for a mercifully short series.
Let's not forget how well groomed and dressed the castaways were. They
must have never worked Mary Ann's domestic skills into the storyline.:-)
the story lines could be ragged but never the costumes.

the Prof COULD have built a transmitter out of coconuts and scrap wire but
Gilligan would inevitably destroy it before it could be used effectively.
Bob Sillett
2004-11-07 01:58:01 UTC
Permalink
I seem to remember the castaways doing something to recharge the batteries.
Didn't the professor have something where they used coconuts or something?

And you're assumption that they were thousands of miles away might not be
right. Look at the evidence:

-- they had a plain, vanilla AM radio
-- stations came in clear as a bell

Maybe they were only stranded 50 or 100 miles away from Oahu!

Bob
Post by lsmyer
Since the mid-1960s, I have searched far and wide to find a radio that had
such good reception as the one on Gilligan's Island.
That incredible DX powerhouse of a radio could regularly pick up US
mainland broadcasters -- KDKA comes to mind -- from its location on a tiny
island located thousands of miles from the US mainland deep in the South
Pacific. Not just at night, mind you, but right in the middle of the day.
Also, this radio contained some amazing self-generating batteries. They
never ran low, despite the fact that there was no AC plug available for
charging purposes, nor did it have any type of crank-based charging
mechanism. It's possible that the batteries might have been the product of
a secret military cold-war era attempt at attaining a self-sustaining,
zero-point energy equilibrium.
I would like to get one of these radios and hopefully some of those
batteries as well. If anybody finds one on ebay, be sure to post it here.
Thanks.
Radio Flyer
2004-11-07 01:59:43 UTC
Permalink
Post by Bob Sillett
I seem to remember the castaways doing something to recharge the batteries.
Didn't the professor have something where they used coconuts or something?
And you're assumption that they were thousands of miles away might not be
-- they had a plain, vanilla AM radio
-- stations came in clear as a bell
Maybe they were only stranded 50 or 100 miles away from Oahu!
Bob
Remember it WAS just a "3 hour tour"
Mark S. Holden
2004-11-07 02:50:44 UTC
Permalink
Post by Radio Flyer
Post by Bob Sillett
I seem to remember the castaways doing something to recharge the batteries.
Didn't the professor have something where they used coconuts or something?
And you're assumption that they were thousands of miles away might not be
-- they had a plain, vanilla AM radio
-- stations came in clear as a bell
Maybe they were only stranded 50 or 100 miles away from Oahu!
Bob
Remember it WAS just a "3 hour tour"
In one episode a surfer arrived on the island after spending 4 days
riding a tsunami.
Bob Haberkost
2004-11-07 02:20:18 UTC
Permalink
I seem to remember the castaways doing something to recharge the batteries. Didn't
the professor have something where they used coconuts or something?
And you're assumption that they were thousands of miles away might not be right.
-- they had a plain, vanilla AM radio
-- stations came in clear as a bell
Maybe they were only stranded 50 or 100 miles away from Oahu!
Bob
Except that (I still remember this as a kid) one time John Facenda, the one-time
voice of NFL Football films and the venerated anchor of the CBS O&O, WCAU, once did a
bit. Now, Philadelphia is a long way from the Pacific no matter which way you go.
--
-----------------------------------------------------------------------------
If there's nothing that offends you in your community, then you know you're not
living in a free society.
Kim Campbell - ex-Prime Minister of Canada - 2004
-----------------------------------------------------------------------------
For direct replies, take out the contents between the hyphens. -Really!-
Frank Dresser
2004-11-07 05:13:33 UTC
Permalink
Post by lsmyer
Since the mid-1960s, I have searched far and wide to find a radio that had
such good reception as the one on Gilligan's Island.
There were at least three radios on Gilligan's Island. The Packard Bell
tabletop (with the add on handle and telescopic antenna), the Hallicrafters
S-40B the Skipper converted into a transmitter and Gilligan's filling, which
somehow turned into a radio receiver.

There were a few radios which came with the several visitors to the island.
Post by lsmyer
That incredible DX powerhouse of a radio could regularly pick up US mainland
broadcasters -- KDKA comes to mind -- from its location on a tiny island
located thousands of miles from the US mainland deep in the South Pacific.
Not just at night, mind you, but right in the middle of the day.
I'm sure we have all figured out the real reason the castaways never got off
the island. It's because they didn't really want to. They were already in
paradise. And good DX is one of the more obscure, yet important, parts of
paradise.
Post by lsmyer
Also, this radio contained some amazing self-generating batteries. They
never ran low, despite the fact that there was no AC plug available for
charging purposes, nor did it have any type of crank-based charging
mechanism. It's possible that the batteries might have been the product of a
secret military cold-war era attempt at attaining a self-sustaining,
zero-point energy equilibrium.
Ah, that's the easy part. Those 60s transistor radios didn't use much
current. I've got an old Silvertone from that era, and it draws less than
15 mils at low volume settings. It's powered with six D cells, and alkaline
cells would run the radio for two to four hours a day for over a year. Half
an hour a week for a couple of years? Piece o' cake.
Post by lsmyer
I would like to get one of these radios and hopefully some of those
batteries as well. If anybody finds one on ebay, be sure to post it here.
Thanks.
Frank Dresser
Sir Cumference
2004-11-07 05:34:18 UTC
Permalink
Post by Frank Dresser
Post by lsmyer
Since the mid-1960s, I have searched far and wide to find a radio that had
such good reception as the one on Gilligan's Island.
There were at least three radios on Gilligan's Island. The Packard Bell
tabletop (with the add on handle and telescopic antenna), the Hallicrafters
S-40B the Skipper converted into a transmitter and Gilligan's filling, which
somehow turned into a radio receiver.
There were a few radios which came with the several visitors to the island.
Post by lsmyer
That incredible DX powerhouse of a radio could regularly pick up US
mainland
Post by lsmyer
broadcasters -- KDKA comes to mind -- from its location on a tiny island
located thousands of miles from the US mainland deep in the South Pacific.
Not just at night, mind you, but right in the middle of the day.
I'm sure we have all figured out the real reason the castaways never got off
the island. It's because they didn't really want to. They were already in
paradise. And good DX is one of the more obscure, yet important, parts of
paradise.
Post by lsmyer
Also, this radio contained some amazing self-generating batteries. They
never ran low, despite the fact that there was no AC plug available for
charging purposes, nor did it have any type of crank-based charging
mechanism. It's possible that the batteries might have been the product of
a
Post by lsmyer
secret military cold-war era attempt at attaining a self-sustaining,
zero-point energy equilibrium.
Ah, that's the easy part. Those 60s transistor radios didn't use much
current. I've got an old Silvertone from that era, and it draws less than
15 mils at low volume settings. It's powered with six D cells, and alkaline
cells would run the radio for two to four hours a day for over a year. Half
an hour a week for a couple of years? Piece o' cake.
Wonder how they powered that S40B with all the tubes?
Frank Dresser
2004-11-07 13:36:28 UTC
Permalink
Post by Sir Cumference
Wonder how they powered that S40B with all the tubes?
I don't exactly remember, but it was an early episode, so I suppose there
was enough juice left in the Minnow's batteries to run a dynamotor.

I also don't know who sabotaged the plan. Might it have been the Professor,
who was enjoyed studying the flora and fauna of the island, and certainly
enjoyed the brand new experience of being the most eligible male on a
paradise island with two beautiful women? Mr. and Mrs. Howell, who were
finally able to enjoy their marriage after Mr. Howell's forced "retirement"
from the grueling 24 hour responsibilities of running Howell Industries?
Ginger, whose Hollywood career was going nowhere fast, and now had to
compete with a younger generation of shapely airheads for B-movie and
C-movie roles? The Skipper might have been faking his sleepwalking in that
episode in order to avoid the ugly mainland questions about his competence
as a Sea Captain. Even Gilligan might have had a dim glimmer of perception
that his uncanny ability to screw up at exactly the critical moment was
useful only to his friends on the island.

I say they were all in on it.

The tragedy of Gilligan's Island, one that we rrs can fully appreciate, is
that Mary Ann was too naive to see that she was surrounded by selfish
dead-enders who were abusing her trust and stealing her chance to have a
normal life.

The children laughed while watching Gilligan's Island because the shows had
a facile sort of comedy. The critics hated it because they're idiots. But
the discerning conspiratorialist can see the show for a metaphor of life as
it really is.

Sherwood Schwartz was a genius.

Frank Dresser
Brian Hill
2004-11-07 15:01:46 UTC
Permalink
Post by Frank Dresser
Post by Sir Cumference
Wonder how they powered that S40B with all the tubes?
I don't exactly remember, but it was an early episode, so I suppose there
was enough juice left in the Minnow's batteries to run a dynamotor.
I also don't know who sabotaged the plan. Might it have been the Professor,
who was enjoyed studying the flora and fauna of the island, and certainly
enjoyed the brand new experience of being the most eligible male on a
paradise island with two beautiful women? Mr. and Mrs. Howell, who were
finally able to enjoy their marriage after Mr. Howell's forced
"retirement"
Post by Frank Dresser
from the grueling 24 hour responsibilities of running Howell Industries?
Ginger, whose Hollywood career was going nowhere fast, and now had to
compete with a younger generation of shapely airheads for B-movie and
C-movie roles? The Skipper might have been faking his sleepwalking in that
episode in order to avoid the ugly mainland questions about his competence
as a Sea Captain. Even Gilligan might have had a dim glimmer of perception
that his uncanny ability to screw up at exactly the critical moment was
useful only to his friends on the island.
I say they were all in on it.
The tragedy of Gilligan's Island, one that we rrs can fully appreciate, is
that Mary Ann was too naive to see that she was surrounded by selfish
dead-enders who were abusing her trust and stealing her chance to have a
normal life.
The children laughed while watching Gilligan's Island because the shows had
a facile sort of comedy. The critics hated it because they're idiots.
But
Post by Frank Dresser
the discerning conspiratorialist can see the show for a metaphor of life as
it really is.
Sherwood Schwartz was a genius.
Frank Dresser
I think I remember some type of human powered generator. It looked like an
exercise bike made of bamboo.
--
73 and good DXing.
Brian
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
A lot of radios and 100' of rusty wire!
Zumbrota, Southern MN
Brian's Radio Universe
http://webpages.charter.net/brianhill/
Dan Gett
2004-11-07 07:42:53 UTC
Permalink
The reception was pretty amazing...that is some groundwave!

You may recall that there was a later episode where the professor had
the entire cast sit at a table and stir liquid in coconut shells in
order to "recharge" the batteries that had finally gone dead...

Perhaps they employed this method often between episodes to make it
SEEM like the batteries lasted forever?

Your thoughts???

Dan

PS Mary Ann is the hotter of the two in my book. Dawn Wells was
actually a beauty pageant winner in real life. Hubba Hubba!
Post by lsmyer
Since the mid-1960s, I have searched far and wide to find a radio that had
such good reception as the one on Gilligan's Island.
That incredible DX powerhouse of a radio could regularly pick up US mainland
broadcasters -- KDKA comes to mind -- from its location on a tiny island
located thousands of miles from the US mainland deep in the South Pacific.
Not just at night, mind you, but right in the middle of the day.
Also, this radio contained some amazing self-generating batteries. They
never ran low, despite the fact that there was no AC plug available for
charging purposes, nor did it have any type of crank-based charging
mechanism. It's possible that the batteries might have been the product of a
secret military cold-war era attempt at attaining a self-sustaining,
zero-point energy equilibrium.
I would like to get one of these radios and hopefully some of those
batteries as well. If anybody finds one on ebay, be sure to post it here.
Thanks.
Dyuob Poltice
2004-11-07 07:56:26 UTC
Permalink
Post by Dan Gett
PS Mary Ann is the hotter of the two in my book. Dawn Wells was
actually a beauty pageant winner in real life. Hubba Hubba!
Ya know, for a 66 year old, she's not too bad either...
(from imdb)

Dawn Wells
Date of birth (location)
18 October 1938
Reno, Nevada, USA

http://www.dawn-wells.com/
Lee Smith
2004-11-07 13:26:29 UTC
Permalink
OK .... so I'll grant you that Mary Ann has held up well over the years and
many of my friends sure liked the look of her, but she was always just a
little too "girl next door" for me.

Ginger on the other hand looked super-hot and used to send me into
alternating hot and cold flashes.

This debate has been timeless and is the subject of a website where you can
cast your vote. I was aghast to find myself in the minority!! No
accounting for some people's taste in women I guess ... LOL. No ... I've
got it, the vote was rigged!

Lee

Here's the link: http://tbs.com/general/story/0,,36370,00.html
dxAce
2004-11-07 13:28:48 UTC
Permalink
Post by Lee Smith
OK .... so I'll grant you that Mary Ann has held up well over the years and
many of my friends sure liked the look of her, but she was always just a
little too "girl next door" for me.
Ginger on the other hand looked super-hot and used to send me into
alternating hot and cold flashes.
This debate has been timeless and is the subject of a website where you can
cast your vote. I was aghast to find myself in the minority!! No
accounting for some people's taste in women I guess ... LOL. No ... I've
got it, the vote was rigged!
It must have been the exit polling after leaving her hut...

dxAce
Michigan
USA
Lee Smith
2004-11-07 14:20:58 UTC
Permalink
Yes Ace, that had to be it. Mary Ann must have used her feminine wiles to
gain unwarranted votes. Who knows went on in the privacy of the hayloft
when she was wearing those plaid shirts and cut-off jeans.

Ginger on the other hand must have been too shy to conduct herself in that
way for something as tawdry as getting a vote.

73 de Lee
lsmyer
2004-11-07 22:09:54 UTC
Permalink
Forget those young girls... I'm a Lovey Man myself.

Mrs Howell had enough money for us to buy the entire South Pacific if we
wanted.

One properly placed poisonous spider in her old man's bunk, and the Widow
Howell and I would soon be free of that old coot forever.

Of course Lovey would need to watch for spiders herself once I got my hands
on the Howell fortune.
Someone
2004-11-07 23:22:59 UTC
Permalink
This [Ginger or Mary Ann] debate has been timeless...
I'll say it is. Whenever I set up a new server for a client that includes
the SharePoint company web site, I always start things off by putting
up a survey entitled, "Ginger or Mary Ann?"

The sad thing is that there are beginning to be some people who don't get it.
TimPerry
2004-11-09 04:47:41 UTC
Permalink
Post by Someone
This [Ginger or Mary Ann] debate has been timeless...
I'll say it is. Whenever I set up a new server for a client that includes
the SharePoint company web site, I always start things off by putting
up a survey entitled, "Ginger or Mary Ann?"
The sad thing is that there are beginning to be some people who don't get it.
all this time its the question that was wrong. it should read; Ginger, Mary
Ann, or both?
Jim Burgan
2004-12-03 04:04:45 UTC
Permalink
Post by Someone
This [Ginger or Mary Ann] debate has been timeless...
I'll say it is. Whenever I set up a new server for a client that includes
the SharePoint company web site, I always start things off by putting
up a survey entitled, "Ginger or Mary Ann?"
The sad thing is that there are beginning to be some people who don't get it.
All this time its the question that was wrong. it should read; Ginger,
Mary
Ann, or both?
Of course a more politically correct version of the debate could very-well
be:
Ginger, Mary Ann, Gilligan or the Professor!
A timeless debate indeed, but I have always cast my vote for Mary Ann.
Ginger was too snooty and I always felt I ("the boy next door") had a chance
with Mary Ann.
There were two or three made for TV movies about the castaways being
rescued, but Tina Louise didn't appear in them.
I haven't seen any of her more recent work, so I can't judge how she's aged,
but last time I saw Dawn Wells, she still looked hot.
-Jim-
Bob Haberkost
2004-12-03 05:38:07 UTC
Permalink
Post by Jim Burgan
This [Ginger or Mary Ann] debate has been timeless...
Ginger, Mary Ann, Gilligan or the Professor!
A timeless debate indeed, but I have always cast my vote for Mary Ann.
Ginger was too snooty and I always felt I ("the boy next door") had a chance with
Mary Ann.
There were two or three made for TV movies about the castaways being rescued, but
Tina Louise didn't appear in them.
I haven't seen any of her more recent work, so I can't judge how she's aged, but
last time I saw Dawn Wells, she still looked hot.
According to Who's Alive and Who's Dead
(http://www.whosaliveandwhosdead.com/ldcontent.htm?category=ldtvfilm#Agilligans)
Russell Johnson just turned 80 last month!
--
-----------------------------------------------------------------------------
If there's nothing that offends you in your community, then you know you're not
living in a free society.
Kim Campbell - ex-Prime Minister of Canada - 2004
-----------------------------------------------------------------------------
For direct replies, take out the contents between the hyphens. -Really!-
McWebber
2004-12-03 14:34:44 UTC
Permalink
Post by Jim Burgan
I haven't seen any of her more recent work, so I can't judge how she's aged,
but last time I saw Dawn Wells, she still looked hot.
Last thing I remember was an episode of Kojack. She looked OK, not like she
did.
--
McWebber
No email replies read
If someone tells you to forward an email to all your friends
please forget that I'm your friend.
SouthDakotaRadio
2004-11-10 15:10:54 UTC
Permalink
Post by Dan Gett
The reception was pretty amazing...that is some groundwave!
Don't forget, it would be a direct saltwater path from Gilligan's Island to
Honolulu.

I assume Honolulu because of the radio's dial position. Notice how the pointer
is always right between 6 and 7?

KORL/Honolulu is on 650. Given it's combination of low dial position and
50,000 watts, it would presumably have the greatest daytime coverage of any
Hawaii station.
Stephanie Weil
2004-11-10 18:13:56 UTC
Permalink
Post by SouthDakotaRadio
KORL/Honolulu is on 650. Given it's combination of low dial position and
It's a shame that according to Radio Locator, KORL is a Radio Disney
repeater now. :(
--
Stephanie Weil
New York City, U.S.A.
Steve Silverwood
2004-11-07 21:08:42 UTC
Permalink
In article <***@corp.supernews.com>, ***@hotmail.com
says...
Post by lsmyer
Also, this radio contained some amazing self-generating batteries. They
never ran low, despite the fact that there was no AC plug available for
charging purposes, nor did it have any type of crank-based charging
mechanism. It's possible that the batteries might have been the product of a
secret military cold-war era attempt at attaining a self-sustaining,
zero-point energy equilibrium.
Sorry to burst your bubble about the batteries, but I remember seeing
some episodes where Gilligan was pedalling a stationary bicycle of sorts
which was generating power. They probably used that to recharge the
batteries. (I presume they were able to salvage the generator from the
SS Minnow's engines.)
--
-- //Steve//

Steve Silverwood, KB6OJS
Fountain Valley, CA
Email: ***@arrl.net
Christopher S. Dunne
2004-11-08 03:02:38 UTC
Permalink
Hey....

Since we're on it, was there *not* one episode of the show where the
announcer on the radio said, "This is KGU Honolulu"?

I keep thinking it was uttered on an episode, but I'm not sure....maybe it
was in a dream of mine....I just thought it unusual to hear *actual* calls &
COL on a fictional show....

Did this *really* happen?

sincerely
Chris
Post by Steve Silverwood
says...
Post by lsmyer
Also, this radio contained some amazing self-generating batteries. They
never ran low, despite the fact that there was no AC plug available for
charging purposes, nor did it have any type of crank-based charging
mechanism. It's possible that the batteries might have been the product of a
secret military cold-war era attempt at attaining a self-sustaining,
zero-point energy equilibrium.
Sorry to burst your bubble about the batteries, but I remember seeing
some episodes where Gilligan was pedalling a stationary bicycle of sorts
which was generating power. They probably used that to recharge the
batteries. (I presume they were able to salvage the generator from the
SS Minnow's engines.)
--
-- //Steve//
Steve Silverwood, KB6OJS
Fountain Valley, CA
Steve Silverwood
2004-11-21 22:01:04 UTC
Permalink
In article <jkBjd.44462$***@bignews4.bellsouth.net>, cd637299
@bellsouth.net says...
Post by Christopher S. Dunne
Hey....
Since we're on it, was there *not* one episode of the show where the
announcer on the radio said, "This is KGU Honolulu"?
I keep thinking it was uttered on an episode, but I'm not sure....maybe it
was in a dream of mine....I just thought it unusual to hear *actual* calls &
COL on a fictional show....
Did this *really* happen?
Could be. I haven't watched a GI episode in many years....
--
-- //Steve//

Steve Silverwood, KB6OJS
Fountain Valley, CA
Email: ***@arrl.net
Jim Burgan
2004-12-03 04:09:08 UTC
Permalink
Post by Steve Silverwood
Post by Christopher S. Dunne
Since we're on it, was there *not* one episode of the show where the
announcer on the radio said, "This is KGU Honolulu"?
I keep thinking it was uttered on an episode, but I'm not sure....maybe it
was in a dream of mine....I just thought it unusual to hear *actual* calls &
COL on a fictional show....
Did this *really* happen?
Could be. I haven't watched a GI episode in many years....
Not in the first season, for sure.
I purchased the first season on DVD and I've seen them all with no legal ID
on the radio.
Yes, I admit that bought the first season... those black & white episodes
with the opening theme that calls the professor & Mary Ann "and the rest".
They went to color in year 2 and changed the theme to give credit to Russ &
Dawn.
drewdawg
2004-12-03 18:36:51 UTC
Permalink
Post by Jim Burgan
Post by Steve Silverwood
Post by Christopher S. Dunne
Since we're on it, was there *not* one episode of the show where the
announcer on the radio said, "This is KGU Honolulu"?
I keep thinking it was uttered on an episode, but I'm not
sure....maybe it
was in a dream of mine....I just thought it unusual to hear *actual* calls &
COL on a fictional show....
Did this *really* happen?
Could be. I haven't watched a GI episode in many years....
Not in the first season, for sure.
I purchased the first season on DVD and I've seen them all with no
legal ID on the radio.
Yes, I admit that bought the first season... those black & white
episodes with the opening theme that calls the professor & Mary Ann
"and the rest". They went to color in year 2 and changed the theme to
give credit to Russ & Dawn.
While this thread is still alive I remember when Gilligan's head became a
radio and the skipper mentioned that if there were two of him they could
have stereo. This was years before Kahn am-stereo. Hmmmm :-\
Brenda Ann
2004-12-03 20:58:17 UTC
Permalink
Post by drewdawg
Post by Jim Burgan
Post by Steve Silverwood
Post by Christopher S. Dunne
Since we're on it, was there *not* one episode of the show where the
announcer on the radio said, "This is KGU Honolulu"?
I keep thinking it was uttered on an episode, but I'm not
sure....maybe it
was in a dream of mine....I just thought it unusual to hear *actual* calls &
COL on a fictional show....
Did this *really* happen?
Could be. I haven't watched a GI episode in many years....
Not in the first season, for sure.
I purchased the first season on DVD and I've seen them all with no
legal ID on the radio.
Yes, I admit that bought the first season... those black & white
episodes with the opening theme that calls the professor & Mary Ann
"and the rest". They went to color in year 2 and changed the theme to
give credit to Russ & Dawn.
While this thread is still alive I remember when Gilligan's head became a
radio and the skipper mentioned that if there were two of him they could
have stereo. This was years before Kahn am-stereo. Hmmmm :-\
But not years before XETRA (then XTRA) were experimenting with AM stereo
using a sort of split modulation scheme (right channel modulating one
sideband and the left modulating the other). They used this for many years.
I used to be able to use two radios, one tuned to each sideband to listen to
(very poor separation) stereo. The system was called the Kahn ISB system,
which stood for Independant SideBand.

25) The sad AM Stereo Saga

a.. 1960 - AM Stereo first demonstrated on XETRA, Tijuana, MX, using the
Kahn ISB system.
Bob Haberkost
2004-12-04 06:18:35 UTC
Permalink
Post by Brenda Ann
Post by drewdawg
While this thread is still alive I remember when Gilligan's head became a
radio and the skipper mentioned that if there were two of him they could
have stereo. This was years before Kahn am-stereo. Hmmmm :-\
But not years before XETRA (then XTRA) were experimenting with AM stereo
using a sort of split modulation scheme (right channel modulating one
sideband and the left modulating the other). They used this for many years.
I used to be able to use two radios, one tuned to each sideband to listen to
(very poor separation) stereo. The system was called the Kahn ISB system,
which stood for Independant SideBand.
That's what drewdawg was talking about. Kahn had a prototype of this system on WABC
in the late '50s. At the time, it was an idea called "powerside", because all the
power was in one sideband. The concept was that you could pack more stations into
the spectrum, since each one would only use on side of the channel. I think it was a
bonehead idea, myself.
--
-----------------------------------------------------------------------------
If there's nothing that offends you in your community, then you know you're not
living in a free society.
Kim Campbell - ex-Prime Minister of Canada - 2004
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